Dreaming of a Tree

Illustration by Roisin O’Donnell – @stevenfritters

A poem originally published in The Bower Monologues.

There’s a gentle, wise tree

With leaves that remind me

The world’s fragility

And I dream of how it would be

If this was my reality

If I could always stay there

Taking refuge in its serenity

CONTINUE READING

Something of You

Illustration by Yifan Hu

A poem originally published in Any Segment Magazine.

Today 

There’s no sun

But there are still the tales

Of the sky

Tonight 

There’s no moon

But there’s still the light 

Of her eyes

CONTINUE READING

Beautiful Mind

Illustration by: Helen Panayi

A poem originally written for and published in Any Segment Magazine

Come closer, child

There’s nothing to be scared of

She whispered, smiling 

She was still like a tree

A tree, having a beautiful dream

I took a step towards her 

And held her hand

I was not afraid

I felt free, as I looked at her hair 

Dancing like a wildflower in the summer air

Welcome, child, she whispered

All we need is here

CONTINUE READING

Silence

Image by unknown

A flash fiction story originally written for and published by The Story Seed.

What he liked most about this small town was the silence that enveloped everything. In winter, even the cars hibernated – all you could hear was the sound your footsteps made on the untouched snow. Late-night winter silence was particularly soothing.

CONTINUE READING

You Are Home

60575aa55cd74bc75959e4e3f059c847
Image by Ramon Haindl.

This flash fiction story was originally written for and published by The Story Seed. It is inspired by and dedicated to the teachings and meditations of Thich Nhat Hanh, a beloved Zen master, spiritual leader, activist and poet.

She closed her eyes and inhaled the sunset mist…

As she let her breath out slowly, a deep sense of nostalgia filled her.

It felt like she was in a long-lost 19th-century Romantic painting.

CONTINUE READING

No Escape

Girl with a Pearl Earring and a Silver Camera. Digital mashup after Johannes Vermeer attributed to Michell Grafton. Image Source.

How social media platforms are being used by young people for experiencing art is a current issue that most people can have an idea about or be familiar with, as it is being focused on and explored constantly. In this short story, I wanted to take a slightly different approach and reflect on the role of social media on experiencing art not from the point of view of a young individual or a millennial; but from the perspective and experience of a pre-social media generation. I hope you’ll enjoy.

CONTINUE READING

Interview with Curator Mine Kaplangı on Art and Social Media

mine-kaplangi-9259

How many art museums or galleries are there today, that don’t have an active Facebook or Twitter page? What about the number of institutions that continue to have inflexible rules when it comes to photography in their spaces? How many of us, especially as millennials, didn’t take a #MuseumSelfie to post on Instagram yet? Even if we don’t know the exact numbers, we can easily guess the answers to these questions. Social media is becoming or already became an indispensable element in the world of art; affecting both how the institutions represent themselves and reach people, and how we experience and perceive art and these institutions; which brings many more interesting questions to the table.

In my interview with Mine Kaplangı, an art curator, artist representative and editor based in Istanbul, I wanted to tackle this growing, intriguing relationship and the questions it raises further. Mine, who is currently working on curating the yearly program of BLOK art space, a well-known contemporary art space in Istanbul, gave many thought-provoking answers to my questions. I hope you’ll enjoy!

CONTINUE READING

Abstract Expressionism at Royal Academy of Arts – Natural Artworks, Filtered Experiences

The Abstract Expressionism exhibition at Royal Academy of Arts (RA) is probably on the list of every art critic or art enthusiast as a ‘must see’ exhibition since it opened on the 24th of September. I guess it is the collective energy this exhibition holds one of the main reasons for its popularity – it is the first major Abstract Expressionism exhibit in the UK since 1959 that gathers more than 150 works, by both the most famous and lesser-known artists of the movement in one space. 

As a final-year university student perplexed by the amount of assignments I have, unfortunately I didn’t have the chance to visit this exhibition in the first few weeks of its opening. But since I really wanted to see it, last Saturday I forced myself to put that stress and cup of coffee aside and yay, I was finally there!

The huge, geometric sculptures of David Smith greeted me when I entered to the RA courtyard, which was already impressive enough even without any work of art. What affected me most about these sculptures were the strong connotations they made to me, of critical yet usually unpleasant concepts such as oppression, insurgence and death– perhaps due to their highly mechanical structure, their large scale or another element that I couldn’t point out for sure – but the profound and even overwhelming effect started to reveal itself at that point, as if hinting what was awaiting me inside. 

Curious and excited, I started discovering what the galleries inside had to offer. Some featured the works of different artists who had a similar approach or common traits in their works together, such as the ‘Darkness Visible’ gallery in which the works by painters like Robert Motherwell and Philip Guston, which all had unique styles and themes they explored yet carried a gloomier, heavier air that unified them, were displayed together. 

CONTINUE READING

Mademoiselle Privé

I’ve mentioned Chanel’s new exhibition Mademoiselle Privé at Saatchi Gallery earlier in my LV Series 3 post as an exhibition not to miss – after visiting, my opinion is definitely the same. It is a unique exhibition, or rather an experience that offers an insight into the classic yet glamorous world of Chanel, created by Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel, and transformed by Karl Lagerfeld.

The exhibition is similar to LV Series 3, in the sense that they both draw on dim lighting, digital technology and can be considered as “multimedia exhibitions” as they involve different forms of media such as audio, video, texts, animations and more. Also, they both greatly encourage visitor engagement.

In fact Mademoiselle Privé carries the use of digital technology & visitor engagement one step further, as there is an app of the same name specially made for the exhibition, in order to enhance the interaction between the exhibition and its visitors.

CONTINUE READING